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Swine Flu

Flu website last updated:  March 09, 2010 4:42pm

 

What’s New?

 

§                Benton-Franklin Health District is continuing FREE vaccination for H1N1. To schedule an appointment call (509) 460-4200.

 

 

§                There is limited availability of seasonal flu vaccine for children 6 months – 18 years old.  Please call (509) 460-4200 to check availability and to make an appointment.

 

BFHD Flu Line:

460-4358 (4FLU)

Don’t Forget: Cover Your Cough and Wash Your Hands

H1N1 en español

Is It the Cold or Flu?

(Printable from National Institutes of Health)

Cold

Symptom

Flu

Rare in adults and older children, but can be up to 102ºF in infants and small children.

Fever

Usually 102ºF, but can rise to 104ºF and usually lasts 3-4 days.

Rare

Headache

Sudden onset, can be severe

Mild

Muscle Aches

Usual, often severe

Mild

Tiredness/Weakness

Can last  2 or more weeks

Never

Extreme exhaustion

Sudden onset, can be severe

Often

Runny Nose

Sometimes

Often

Sneezing

Sometimes

Often

Sore throat

Sometimes

Mild, hacking cough

Cough

Usual, can become severe

Seasonal Flu

Seasonal Flu shots are in limited supply at this time.  Click here for more information about flu shots available from the Health District. 

Know What to do

About the Flu (from Flu.gov)

·   Information for People with Asthma (PDF)

·   Information for People with Diabetes or Who Have a Weakened Immune System (PDF)

·   Information for Doctors and Other Health Care Providers (PDF)

·   Emergency Warning Signs (PDF)

·   Information for Everyone (PDF)

·   Information for Parents and Caregivers of Young Children (PDF)

·   Information for Pregnant Women (PDF)

·   10 Ways You Can Stay Healthy at Work (PDF)

·   Who’s at High Risk for Complications? (PDF)

More from flu.gov

Have the Flu?

·        If you have flu-like symptoms, stay home, drink fluids, and take non-aspirin fever reducing medication.  Most people just need time at home to get better.

·        Call your healthcare provider if your symptoms get worse. 

·        It is not necessary to be tested to confirm your illness. 

 

Click here for more information about caring for yourself or others at home.

H1N1 (Swine) Flu

Medical provider?

Updated 10/15/09 Click here to go directly to materials available on our website specific to medical providers and laboratories.

 

School Official?

Please continue to monitor and report school attendance that exceeds 10% absenteeism.   Click here for current materials available on our website.

 

Materials to Print

Updated 10/13/09 Click here to go directly to materials available to print from our website.

Caring for someone ill?

Use the same judgment as you use during a typical flu season.  Click here for more information.

 

Do not seek medical care if you are not ill or if you have mild symptoms for which you would not ordinarily seek medical care. 

 

If you have more severe symptoms of fever (over 100°F), cough, sore throat, body aches, or are feeling seriously ill, call your health care provider to discuss your symptoms and if you need to be evaluated.

Vaccines

 

***Seasonal Flu***

Limited seasonal flu vaccine is still available at the three Benton-Franklin Health District Offices.  Vaccination is provided by appointment only.  Appointments for Pasco and Kennewick Offices may be scheduled by calling

(509) 460-4200.

Read more from the CDC about the vaccines used for seasonal flu.

 

***H1N1 Flu***

Benton-Franklin Health District will be providing H1N1 vaccine for the GENERAL PUBLIC BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. 

To schedule an appointment call (509) 460-4510.

 

 

Please continue to practice personal precautions to protect themselves and their families:

  • wash your hands
  • cover your cough
  • stay home when you are ill

 

If you do become ill:

  • drink plenty of fluids
  • take non-aspirin fever reducing medication
  • call your healthcare provider if your symptoms become worse

Expect that you will be ill for about a week, and stay home until you have had no fever (without medication) for 24 hours.

 

Read more from the CDC about the vaccine used for H1N1.

People with flu should:

·         call their health care provider about any special care if they:

    • are pregnant
    • have a health condition such as diabetes, heart disease, asthma, or emphysema
    • have severe symptoms (see emergency warning signs)

 

·         keep away from others as much as possible. This is to keep from making others sick. Do not go to work or school while ill.

 

·         stay home for at least 24 hours after fever is gone, except to seek medical care or for other necessities. (Fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.)

 

·         get plenty of rest

 

·         drink clear fluids (such as water, broth, sports drinks, electrolyte beverages for infants) to keep from being dehydrated

 

·         cover coughs and sneezes with a sleeve or tissue (not a bare hand).

 

·         wash hands often with soap and water.  If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.  Switch to using paper towels to dry hands to avoid sharing your germs on a common cloth towel (or designate one towel for each person and wash the towels often).

 

·         be watchful for emergency warning signs that might indicate you need to seek medical attention.

For Children

·         Fast breathing or trouble breathing

·         Fever with rash

·         Bluish skin color

·         Not drinking enough fluids

·         Not waking up

·         Irritable

·         Symptoms improve but return or get worse

For Adults

·         Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath

·         Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen

·         Sudden dizziness

·         Confusion

·         Severe or persistent vomiting

 

Symptoms of dehydration…

Symptoms of dehydration in adults and children include:

·        a decrease in urination

·        a dry mouth and throat

·        feeling dizzy when standing up

·        crying with few or no tears

·        children that are unusually sleepy or fussy

 

Be sure to drink plenty of fluids.

What about masks?

 

We are not recommending masks for the general community.  If you are symptomatic (coughing with fever), please stay home.  If you are sick and must be around others or visit your health care provider, please cover your mouth with a tissue or mask to help keep others in our community healthy. 

 

Coughing into tissues, masks, or a shirt sleeve helps keep germs in fabrics rather than spreading to hands, nearby people, or other surfaces. 

 

Stop the spread:  Stay home if you’re sick and keep it covered if you cough!

Gripe H1N1 (gripe porcina)

 

 

 

 

 

 

H1N1 Flu and Neighboring Areas

When should you seek medical care for this influenza?

Information from Neighboring Counties, States and British Columbia:

 

Worldwide

 

Use the same judgment as you use during a typical flu season. 

 

Do not seek medical care if you are not ill or if you have mild symptoms for which you would not ordinarily seek medical care. 

 

If you have more severe symptoms of fever (over 100°F), cough, sore throat, body aches, or are feeling seriously ill, call your health care provider to discuss your symptoms and if you need to be evaluated.

More About H1N1 Flu (Swine flu)

 

Is the H1N1 Flu virus contagious?

Yes. CDC has determined that this H1N1 Flu virus is contagious and is spreading from person to person.

What are the signs and symptoms of H1N1 Flu  in people?
The symptoms of swine flu in people are similar to the symptoms of regular human flu and include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people have reported diarrhea and vomiting associated with swine flu. Like seasonal flu, H1N1 Flu may cause a worsening of underlying chronic medical conditions.

How does H1N1 Flu spread?
Spread of this swine flu virus is thought to be the same way that seasonal flu spreads. Flu viruses are spread mainly from person to person through coughing or sneezing of ill people. People may also become infected by touching something with flu viruses on it and then touching their mouth or nose.

How can someone with the flu infect someone else?
Infected people may be able to infect others beginning 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 7 or more days after becoming sick. That means that you may be able to pass on the flu to someone else before you know you are sick, as well as while you are sick.

What should I do to keep from getting the flu?
First and most important: wash your hands. Try to stay in good general health:  get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food. Try not to touch surfaces that may be contaminated with the flu virus, and keep your hands away from your eyes, nose and mouth. Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

Is this the same as the bird flu that has been in the news in recent years?

No. There are many different types of influenza viruses. The bird flu virus that has been watched closely is categorized as influenza A (H5N1), and is transmitted primarily among birds. This virus still has not been found in the United States.

What about the safety of pork?

H1N1 Flu viruses are not transmitted by food so you cannot get the flu from eating pork or pork products. Eating properly handled and cooked pork or pork products is safe.  The USDA recommends cooking pork to an internal temperature of 160°F to kill foodborne pathogens.

 

 

H1N1 Flu (swine flu)

What You Can Do To Stay Healthy

 

General Information About H1N1 Flu

 

Information on H1N1 Flu in Additional Languages (from DOH)

 

Videos

 

Information About the Investigation

 

Information Regarding Pig Care and Pork Safety

 

There are everyday actions you can take to stay healthy.

  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze.
  • Alcohol-based hands gels are also effective.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread that way.

What about masks?

 

We are not recommending masks for the general community.  If you are symptomatic (coughing with fever), please stay home.  If you must be around others or visit your health care provider, please cover your mouth with a tissue or mask to help keep others in our community healthy. 

 

Coughing into tissues, masks, or a shirt sleeve helps keep germs in fabrics rather than spreading to hands, nearby people, or other surfaces. 

 

Stop the spread:  Stay home if you’re sick and keep it covered if you cough!

Try to avoid close contact with sick people.

  • Influenza is thought to spread mainly person-to-person through coughing or sneezing of infected people.
  • If you are sick, please stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from making them sick.

 

Travel

General Information

·         CDC H1N1 Flu and Travel

·         CDC Traveler’s Health Webpage

 

Delays, Restrictions, and Precautions

 

Hygiene and Educational Materials Available to Print

Emergency Preparedness

Handwashing

 

Cold and Flu Brochures

 

Stop Germs Posters

 

Cover Your Cough Brochures and Posters

 

Mask Sign (for symptomatic cases)

 

Disinfection Information (DOH materials)

 

Click Here for Additional H1N1 materials from DOH

 

Click Here for Materials in Multiple Languages from Minnesota

Benton-Franklin Health District

 

Local Emergency Management Offices

 

American Red Cross

 

Emergency Preparedness Factsheets (DOH)

 

National Website

 

Planning Checklists

 

Home

 

Work

 

Community Organizations and Churches

 

Disaster Behavior Concerns

 

Interim Guidance for Specific Groups (CDC)

Pregnant Women

Employers of Migrant Workers

·            Interim Guidance for Employers for Protection of Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers from the Novel H1N1 Flu Virus

 

Taking Care of Sick People at Home

 

 

Links of Interest

People with flu should:

·         call their health care provider about any special care if they:

    • are pregnant
    • have a health condition such as diabetes, heart disease, asthma, or emphysema
    • have severe symptoms (see emergency warning signs)

 

·         keep away from others as much as possible. This is to keep from making others sick. Do not go to work or school while ill.

 

·         stay home for at least 24 hours after fever is gone, except to seek medical care or for other necessities. (Fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.)

 

·         get plenty of rest

 

·         drink clear fluids (such as water, broth, sports drinks, electrolyte beverages for infants) to keep from being dehydrated

 

·         cover coughs and sneezes with a sleeve or tissue (not a bare hand).

 

·         wash hands often with soap and water.  If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.  Switch to using paper towels to dry hands to avoid sharing your germs on a common cloth towel (or designate one towel for each person and wash the towels often).

 

 

Cleaning and Sanitizing:  Common Questions (from the CDC)

How long can influenza virus remain viable on objects (such as books and doorknobs)?

Studies have shown that influenza virus can survive on surfaces and can infect a person for 2 to 8 hours after being ‘dropped’ (such as from coughing or sneezing) on the surface.

What kills influenza virus?

Influenza is destroyed by high heat (167-212°F). Several chemical sanitizers, including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, detergents, iodine-based antiseptics, and alcohols are also effective against influenza viruses if used in proper concentration for a long enough amount of time.   Read and follow package directions carefully.  Make sure the label says “disinfectant” and that it works against Influenza A.

What surfaces are most likely to be sources of contamination?

Anything that is handled has the potential to spread germs.  Droplets from a cough or sneeze of an infected person can move through the air or fall onto a surface like a desk or the person’s hands.  Germs can then be spread when people touch that surface and then touch their own eyes, mouth or nose before washing their hands.

How should waste disposal be handled to prevent the spread of influenza virus?

To prevent the spread of influenza virus, it is recommended that used tissues be thrown in the trash. Additionally, persons should wash their hands with soap and water after touching used tissues and similar waste.

What household cleaning should be done to prevent the spread of influenza virus?

To prevent the spread of influenza virus it is important to keep surfaces (especially bedside tables, surfaces in the bathroom, kitchen counters and toys for children) clean by wiping them down with a household disinfectant according to directions on the product label.

How should linens, eating utensils and dishes of persons infected with influenza virus be handled?

Linens, eating utensils, and dishes belonging to those who are sick do not need to be cleaned separately, but these items should not be shared without washing first.

Linens (such as bed sheets and towels) should be washed by using laundry soap and tumbled dry on a hot setting. Avoid "hugging" laundry before washing and wash your hands with soap and water immediately after handling dirty laundry.  Eating utensils may be washed either in a dishwasher or by hand with water and soap.

Watch for emergency warning signs that indicate you need to seek medical attention.

For Children

·         Fast breathing or trouble breathing

·         Fever with rash

·         Bluish skin color

·         Not drinking enough fluids

·         Not waking up

·         Irritable

·         Symptoms improve but return or get worse

 

For Adults

·         Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath

·         Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen

·         Sudden dizziness

·         Confusion

·         Severe or persistent vomiting

 

Guidance for Health Care Providers & First Responders

 

 

Guidance for Clinicians, Laboratories, Care Providers, and Medical Facilities

Influenza Surveillance Updates

 

Testing and Vaccination

 

Care Guidelines

 

Infection Control and Environmental Disinfection

 

FDA Information

 

Interim Guidance for First Responders

 

Interim Guidance for Medical Examiners

 

Additional Sources of Information

 

 

Guidance for School & Childcare Officials

 

 

 

 

 

 

Media Releases Related to H1N1 Flu (Swine flu)

BFHD

 

DOH Newsroom:  http://www.doh.wa.gov/h1n1/h1n1_newsroom.htm

 

 

Thank you for washing your hands, covering your cough, and staying home if you’re ill.

 

 


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Benton Franklin Health District
Kennewick
7102 W Okanogan Pl
Kennewick WA
99336
(509) 460 4200
Pasco
412 W Clark
Pasco WA
99301
(509) 547-9737
IN CASE OF EMERGENCY PLEASE CALL 911

If you are either a medical practitioner, first responder, or public works official and need to report an emergency that immediately endangers public health, please call 509-543-3851. Only medical practitioners, first responders, and public works officials may use this number.
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